CAP supports Air Force’s Super Bowl airspace security missions

 
The California Wing will fly Tuesday in Fresno and on Feb. 3 in Oakland to help ensure the safety and security of airspace around Super Bowl 50.
 
In order to help train Air Force fighter aircrews and maintain their proficiency, Civil Air Patrol flies its Cessna airplanes into “restricted airspace” to simulate a trespassing aircraft while Air Force jet crews practice intercept techniques. The Air Force pilots fly alongside the CAP plane, make radio contact and guide it out of the restricted airspace.
 
Since the terroristic attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the Federal Aviation Administration routinely implements “no-fly zones,” referred to as a Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR), around major events like the Super Bowl. Airspace around the venue is restricted from all general aviation traffic for a specified radius to ensure no aircraft enter. The TFR is enforced by the U.S. Air Force, which has fighter aircraft patrolling the area during the time of the restriction.